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The First Day Of School

The First Day Of School

he five-year-old walked to the shelf to get a little tray containing six pictures.  He brought them back to his work rug where he had a movable alphabet, a box of sorted, individual letters.  He also had a card that said “ee” that went with the set of pictures he had chosen.  Within five minutes […]

“Why don’t we have grades?”

“Why don’t we have grades?”

hat was a question asked by an upper elementary student during a class meeting last week. “Why don’t we have grades at Post Oak?”  The spirit of the question, and the interested looks from the questioner’s classmates, suggested that this was more of a “Tell-us-about-Dr.-Montessori”-kind-of-question rather than an appeal for a missing entree at the banquet […]

More Evolution

hose babies are so cute! They are carried in by their mothers to the prepared environment beside my office.  Of course, this causes me to sometimes drop what I’m doing in order to observe them. I can’t help myself. Ashley Montague wrote in Growing Young that there is an evolutionary advantage to a baby’s cuteness. […]

Fun

Childhood is a time to have fun. At Post Oak the children are always working. Don’t Montessori children have fun?” This is a good, honest question that seeks out the nature of early childhood education, in fact, the very nature of childhood. This question perfectly expresses a mistake we adults often make in thinking about […]

Art or Science?

  wo five-year-old girls have created the solar system.  It is larger than they are, rendered in tempera paint on paper that must be ten feet long.  The planets are drawn to scale and painted to match our best photos of the heavenly spheres.  The background, the vast emptiness of space between the planets, is […]

Did Maria Montessori Wear Khaki?

 couple of years ago full page advertisements appeared in glossy magazines featuring photos of famous people wearing khaki pants:  “Humphrey Bogart wore khaki,” or “Ernest Hemingway wore khaki.” You get the idea. Although she was famous, Maria Montessori did not wear khaki. But that ad campaign came to mind recently when Barbara Walters interviewed Sergey […]

The Red Rods

The Red Rods

is hands were stretched far apart, but not all the way to the ends of the red rod, the longest one of a graduated set of ten. He walked with the slight wobble of a three year old as he carried the one meter long rod across the classroom. He stopped to wait for two […]

“I Wish I’d Had the Courage …”

h!  A Montessori mother!” responded another woman in the needlepoint class when she heard that the children attend Post Oak School. Waiting for the other shoe to drop, the Montessori mother asked, “Where does your daughter go to school?” We’ve all been there:  the mention of Montessori evokes a response in people. Sometimes we feel […]

The Smile

The Smile

his is a story about eight wooden blocks and a five-year-old girl. The eight wooden blocks are nestled in a hinged wooden box. The five-year-old girl is sitting alone at a small wooden table. She is very good at arithmetic, her teacher tells me, but rarely chooses to work with this kind of spatial, three-dimensional […]

The Celebration of Thinking

n The Celebration of Thinking  Elliot Eisner, professor of education and art  at Stanford University writes,: We should be concerned about curricula that place a heavy emphasis on limited forms of learning and thinking.  When limited forms of learning dominate curricula, they also cultivate a disposition.  Following rules and applying algorithms do not match the […]

Montessori Talks to Parents: Our Parent Forums

Montessori Talks to Parents: Our Parent Forums

ast week was the first session of “Montessori Talks to Parents,” a series of six meetings. It is but one opportunity from among a rich offering from the parent education committee. I laud their efforts.  In trying to respond to your needs, the committee is offering a variety of programs focused on Montessori education, parenting […]

The Referral

The Referral

t was her second visit in a week. Mrs. Jones described her son as kind and gentle, a truly sweet child, but retiring, even cautious. “Would Post Oak admit him as a five-year-old?” We would consider it.Though we ordinarily admit children at three or younger, some older children do enter successfully. Until now he has […]